Category Archives: Israel and the Church

The Church’s Prophetic Witness As Key to Israel’s Survival

… Far from being the “Ark of Safety” (a term used by many to encourage the present ‘Aliyah’), the Land will be the first target and greatest concentration of Antichrist fury. We have this burden that it is critical that believers in the Land today understand that Jewish survival will depend on escape into surrounding wilderness locations (Isa 26:20; Dan 11:41; Mt 24:16). This message will have a direct bearing on the physical survival of the elect remnant of Israel. It is the responsibility of a prophetically instructed church (Dan 11:33) that has taken seriously the Lord’s command to pay attention to Daniel (“Let the reader understand”, Mt 24:15). Ultimately, it will be seen that many were saved alive through the words of Jesus directing His disciples (the church) to pay attention to Daniel. To Him be all the glory that a people were alerted and prepared to direct Jews not only to the urgency of flight, but also to the testimony of Jesus (“the testimony of Jesus is the spirit of prophecy” Rev 19:10). … Continue reading

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The Glorious Reconciliation of Arab & Jew

… After his long night of wrestling (Jacob’s trouble) with the Angel of the Lord, Jacob goes out with a limp (touched in the thigh of his strength) to meet Esau, the brother of the blood oath, who now falls on his neck with kisses and weeping. What a picture! So when Jacob has come to an end of his power (Deut 32:36; Dan 12:7), he will find the implacable hatred of his estranged and outraged brother has also come to its end in a glorious day of reconciliation and healing in the face of Jesus Christ. … Continue reading

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One or Two Peoples of God: Reflections on the Mystery of Israel and the Church

… It is correct to distinguish between the ‘Israel after the flesh’ and the church. But dispensationalism incorrectly divides between the seed of Abraham after the Spirit, saying that saved Jews before Pentecost and saved Jews living in the millennium do not belong to the church. In this way, there are two distinct ‘regenerate’ peoples of God belonging to two eternally distinct entities with different destinies. This constitutes a false view of the nature of the church. Hence, they fail to see that those of the natural seed of Abraham that are predestined for national salvation at Christ’s return will be as much a part of the body of Christ on earth as any living now before the Lord’s return. It is a question of what defines the church. … Continue reading

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The Use of Prophecy in Evangelism and the Church’s Call to Israel

All modern trends are moving inexorably in the direction predicted by the Hebrew prophets. In addition to keeping the church wakeful, this fact should be continually pointed to in the church’s witness, as a powerful evidence of the Bible’s authority … Continue reading

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David Baron, Adolph Saphir (and other Recommended Reading)

[…] Baron is conservative; he imbibed none of the German higher criticism so stylish in the biblical scholarship of his day. He wrote a commentary on “The Visions and Prophecy of Zechariah”. That one should be readily available through Amazon, or christianbook.com. Among the titles by him are Rays of Messiah’s Glory; The Shepherd of Israel, The Servant of Jehovah, Types Psalms and Prophecies, A Divine Forecast of Jewish History; The History of the Ten “Lost” Tribes: Anglo-Israelism Examined; The Ancient Scriptures for the Modern Jew; and Israel in the Plan of God, also published under the title: The History of Israel: Its Spiritual Significance. There is also one on the Melchizedek Priesthood. These are all back in print through Keren Ahvah Meshihit; P. O. Box 10382, 91103 Jerusalem, Israel. […] Continue reading

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